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Powering Up PowerShell: 3 Ways to Read JSON Files

When working with PowerShell, reading JSON files is a common requirement. In this article, we will explore three ways to read JSON files in PowerShell: using Get-Content, ConvertFrom-Json, and Invoke-WebRequest.

We will look at the primary keywords associated with each method, along with examples of how to use them.PowerShell is a powerful scripting language and is widely used by system administrators and developers for automating administrative tasks. Reading JSON files is a common requirement when automating tasks related to web services or data processing.

JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) is a popular data format used for exchanging data between the web server and client. Reading JSON files in PowerShell can be done in various ways.

It can be overwhelming to know which method to use, however, understanding the primary keywords for each command can make it easy to decide which method to use. Without further ado, let’s explore the three methods of reading JSON files in PowerShell.

Using Get-Content command

Get-Content is a popular PowerShell command used for reading and displaying the contents of a file. It can read different file types, including JSON files, which can be read as a string.

The primary keywords associated with Get-Content command in this context are “read JSON file” and “output as string.”

Example usage:

“`

$jsonContent = Get-Content C:datasample.json -Raw

“`

The above code reads a JSON file named sample.json, located at path C:data, and stores its contents as a string in a variable named $jsonContent. The -Raw parameter used in the command ensures that the JSON file is read as a single string and not an array of strings.

Using ConvertFrom-Json command

ConvertFrom-Json is a PowerShell command used to convert a JSON-formatted string into a PowerShell custom object. The primary keywords associated with ConvertFrom-Json are “JSON-formatted string” and “PowerShell custom object.”

Example usage:

“`

$jsonContent = Get-Content C:datasample.json -Raw

$customObject = ConvertFrom-Json $jsonContent

“`

The above code reads a JSON file named sample.json, located at path C:data, as a string using Get-Content command and then converts it into a PowerShell custom object using ConvertFrom-Json command.

The converted object is stored in a variable named $customObject.

Using Invoke-WebRequest command

Invoke-WebRequest is a PowerShell command used for interacting with web services. It can be used to make HTTP requests and retrieve JSON responses.

The primary keyword associated with Invoke-WebRequest in this context is “JSON.”

Example usage:

“`

$response = Invoke-WebRequest “https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1”

$jsonContent = $response.Content

$customObject = ConvertFrom-Json $jsonContent

“`

The above code makes an HTTP GET request to the URL “https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1” using Invoke-WebRequest and stores the response in a variable named $response. The content of the response is then extracted as a string using “$response.Content” and converted into a PowerShell custom object using ConvertFrom-Json command.

Get-Content command for reading JSON

Get-Content command can read JSON files as a string using the -Raw parameter. This method is simple and easy to use and only requires a single line of code.

It is ideal for scenarios where the JSON file is small or when only the contents of the file need to be read.

Conclusion

Reading JSON files is a common requirement when working with PowerShell. Different commands can be used to read JSON files, including Get-Content, ConvertFrom-Json, and Invoke-WebRequest.

Understanding the primary keywords associated with each command makes it easy to choose which command to use. Get-Content command is an ideal method for reading JSON files as a string when the JSON file is small or when only the contents of the file need to be read.

Reading JSON files in PowerShell is a common task, especially when performing web-related automation or data processing. There are different ways to read JSON files in PowerShell, including using the Get-Content, ConvertFrom-Json, and Invoke-WebRequest commands.

In this article, we will dig deeper into using the ConvertFrom-Json and Invoke-WebRequest commands to read JSON files, exploring their primary keywords and providing detailed examples of how to use them.

ConvertFrom-Json command for reading JSON

ConvertFrom-Json is a PowerShell command used to convert a JSON-formatted string into a PowerShell custom object. It is a powerful command that can handle complex JSON data with nested objects and arrays.

The primary keywords associated with ConvertFrom-Json are “JSON-formatted string” and “PowerShell custom object.” When reading a JSON file using this command, the JSON data is first read as a string, and then converted into a custom object using the ConvertFrom-Json command. Here is an example of how to use the ConvertFrom-Json command to read and process JSON data from a file:

“`

$jsonContent = Get-Content “C:datasample.json” -Raw

$customObject = ConvertFrom-Json $jsonContent

“`

In the above code, the Get-Content command is used to read the contents of the JSON file located at C:datasample.json and returns it as a string.

The -Raw parameter is used to read the file as a single string instead of an array of strings. The string is then passed to the ConvertFrom-Json command, which converts the JSON-formatted string into a PowerShell custom object, which can be manipulated for further processing.

Reading JSON files from the web in PowerShell

Working with web services or performing data processing sometimes requires reading JSON data from web APIs. PowerShell provides a simple and elegant solution to read data from the web using the Invoke-WebRequest command. The primary keywords associated with reading JSON data from the web using Invoke-WebRequest are “JSON”, “web request,” “Invoke-WebRequest,” and “ConvertFrom-Json.”

Here is an example of how to use the Invoke-WebRequest and ConvertFrom-Json commands to read and process JSON data from a web API:

“`

$url = “https://api.publicapis.org/entries”

$response = Invoke-WebRequest $url

$jsonContent = $response.Content

$customObject = ConvertFrom-Json $jsonContent

“`

In the above code, the Invoke-WebRequest command is used to request JSON data from the web API located at the URL specified by the $url variable.

The response is stored in a variable named $response, which includes headers, status codes, and the actual response content. We then extract the JSON content from the response using the “$response.Content” syntax and store it as a string in a variable named $jsonContent.

Finally, the string is converted into a PowerShell custom object using the ConvertFrom-Json command and stored in a variable named $customObject. This custom object can now be manipulated and accessed for data processing and analysis.

Conclusion

Reading JSON files in PowerShell is a crucial skill for anyone working with automation or data processing. Understanding the different methods of reading JSON files, such as Get-Content, ConvertFrom-Json, and Invoke-WebRequest, can help you choose the best method for your scenario.

Using the ConvertFrom-Json command, you can convert a JSON-formatted string into a PowerShell custom object, which is highly useful for complex JSON data. Using the Invoke-WebRequest command, you can read JSON data from web APIs and convert it into a PowerShell custom object for further processing and analysis.

When combined with other PowerShell commands and techniques, these methods can unlock the full potential of PowerShell for automating administrative tasks, data processing, and more. In conclusion, reading JSON files in PowerShell is a crucial skill for anyone working with automation or data processing.

The three methods of reading JSON files in PowerShell include Get-Content, ConvertFrom-Json, and Invoke-WebRequest. Get-Content is useful for small JSON files, while ConvertFrom-Json is ideal for complex JSON data.

Invoke-WebRequest is used for reading JSON data from web APIs. Understanding the primary keywords and how to use each method will enable you to choose the best method for your scenario. Ultimately, mastering these skills can unlock the full potential of PowerShell for automating administrative tasks, data processing, and more.

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