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Mastering File Management in Ubuntu: Essential Commands for Opening Files

Opening Files in Ubuntu: A Guide to Using the Right Commands

If you’re new to Ubuntu, you might find that opening files can be a challenge. Thankfully, there are specific commands you can use to make the process a lot easier.

In this article, we’ll discuss the open command, xdg-open, nano, shotwell, and Evince, among other essential tools you’ll need to open files on Ubuntu effectively. Problem with the “open” command

One of the most common problems with the “open” command is that it doesn’t work consistently across different applications.

For instance, if you try to use the “open” command to launch a PDF file, it might open in a web browser instead of a dedicated PDF viewer. Similarly, if you try to launch a text file using “open,” it might not open in your preferred text editor.

This can be frustrating because it slows down your workflow and makes it hard to keep track of which application you’re using. Solution with “xdg-open” command

Fortunately, there’s a solution to this problem: the “xdg-open” command.

The “xdg-open” command is designed to open files using the default application set by Ubuntu. For example, if you type “xdg-open” followed by the name of a PDF file, it will open in the PDF viewer you have set as your default.

If you’re not sure what the default application is for a particular file type, you can check the “Open With” menu in the file browser. This menu will show you what applications are currently set as the default for each file type.

Opening text files with “nano” command

Of course, sometimes you might want to open a text file directly in the terminal, especially if you’re working remotely or on a server. In this case, you can use the “nano” command, which is a simple text editor that runs in the terminal.

To open a file using nano, simply type “nano” followed by the name of the file. You can then edit the file directly in the terminal, which is convenient if you don’t have a graphical interface available.

Opening image and video files with “shotwell” command

If you’re looking to open image and video files, you might want to try the “shotwell” command. Shotwell is a digital photo organizer that can also play videos.

To open a file using shotwell, simply type “shotwell” followed by the name of the file. Shotwell will then launch and display the file you selected.

If you’re looking to organize your digital photo collection, you might want to spend some time learning how to use Shotwell. It’s a robust tool that can help you keep your photos and videos organized.

Opening PDF files with “Evince” command

Finally, if you’re looking for a dedicated PDF viewer, you might want to try the “Evince” command. Evince is a lightweight document viewer that can handle PDF, Postscript, djvu, tiff, dvi, and XPS files.

To open a PDF file using Evince, simply type “evince” followed by the name of the file. Evince will then launch and display the file you selected.

If you’re looking for a simple but powerful PDF viewer, Evince is a great choice. Differences between “open” command on Ubuntu and MAC

One thing to note is that the “open” command works differently in Ubuntu than it does on MAC.

On a MAC, the “open” command can be used to open any file, regardless of its type. It’s also possible to create aliases for the “open” command, which makes it easy to launch frequently used files or applications.

In contrast, the “open” command on Ubuntu is more limited in what it can do. It’s designed to open files using the default application, which means you’ll need to use other commands, such as “xdg-open,” to open files in different applications.

Conclusion

In conclusion, opening files on Ubuntu can be difficult if you’re not familiar with the appropriate commands. However, by using commands like “xdg-open,” “nano,” “shotwell,” and “Evince,” you can open files quickly and efficiently, regardless of their type.

Additionally, by understanding the differences between Ubuntu and MAC, you can avoid any confusion when using the “open” command on different operating systems. With these tools at your disposal, you’ll be able to work more productively and make the most of your Ubuntu system.

In this article, we explored different commands to open files on Ubuntu, including the “xdg-open,” “nano,” “shotwell,” and “Evince” commands. We also discussed the limitations of the “open” command and the differences between Ubuntu and MAC.

By using these commands, you can open files more efficiently and make the most of your Ubuntu system. Remember, using the right commands can save time and increase productivity, and it’s essential to understand the differences between different operating systems.

Let these takeaways guide you as you navigate Ubuntu and its various commands.

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