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Master Responsive Web Development with React Hooks and Conditional Rendering

The Importance of Responsiveness in Web Development

When it comes to web development, one of the most important factors to consider is responsiveness. But what exactly does that mean?

In simple terms, responsiveness refers to a website’s ability to adapt and adjust to different screen sizes and resolutions. This is crucial because more and more people are accessing the internet through mobile devices, and a website that doesn’t accommodate this trend is likely to lose valuable traffic.

In this article, we will explore how to ensure responsiveness on your website, specifically by accessing window width in React.

Storing Window Width Value in Component State

To access the window width in React, you first need to store it in component state. This allows you to access and modify the value more efficiently.

To do this, you can create a state variable called “width” and set it to the initial window width value using the useEffect hook. import React, { useEffect, useState } from “react”;

function App() {

const [width, setWidth] = useState(window.innerWidth);

useEffect(() => {

const handleResize = () => setWidth(window.innerWidth);

window.addEventListener(“resize”, handleResize);

return () => window.removeEventListener(“resize”, handleResize);

}, []);

return

Window width: {width}

;

}

In this example, we created a function component called “App” and imported the useEffect and useState hooks from React.

We then created a state variable called “width” and set its initial value to “window.innerWidth”. We then used the useEffect hook to add an event listener that updates the “width” value whenever the window is resized.

Finally, we returned the “width” value inside a div.

Getting Window Width in React Class Components

If you’re using a React class component, you can still access the window width using the “componentDidMount” and “componentWillUnmount” lifecycle methods. The “componentDidMount” method is called when the component is first mounted to the DOM, and the “componentWillUnmount” method is called just before the component is removed from the DOM.

import React from “react”;

class App extends React.Component {

state = { width: window.innerWidth };

componentDidMount() {

window.addEventListener(“resize”, this.handleResize);

}

componentWillUnmount() {

window.removeEventListener(“resize”, this.handleResize);

}

handleResize = () => {

this.setState({ width: window.innerWidth });

};

render() {

return

Window width: {this.state.width}

;

}

}

In this example, we created a class component called “App” and initialized its state with a property called “width” set to “window.innerWidth”. We then used the componentDidMount method to add an event listener that updates the “width” value whenever the window is resized.

We also used the componentWillUnmount method to remove the event listener just before the component is removed from the DOM. Finally, we returned the “width” value inside a div.

Getting Window Width in React Function Components

If you prefer to use function components in React, you can access the window width using the “useEffect” and “useWindowDimensions” hooks. The “useEffect” hook is called after every rendering of the component, allowing you to perform side effects like adding or removing event listeners.

The “useWindowDimensions” hook is a custom hook that gives you access to the window dimensions. import React, { useEffect } from “react”;

import useWindowDimensions from “./useWindowDimensions”;

function App() {

const { width } = useWindowDimensions();

useEffect(() => {

const handleResize = () => {

// do something when the window is resized

};

window.addEventListener(“resize”, handleResize);

return () => window.removeEventListener(“resize”, handleResize);

}, []);

return

Window width: {width}

;

}

In this example, we created a function component called “App” and imported the useEffect hook from React as well as a custom hook called “useWindowDimensions”.

We then used the “useWindowDimensions” hook to get the current window width value and returned it inside a div. We also used the useEffect hook to add and remove an event listener that updates the “width” value whenever the window is resized.

Conclusion

Ensuring responsiveness on your website is crucial in today’s world where more and more people are accessing the internet through mobile devices. By accessing window width in React and storing it in component state, you can easily adapt and adjust your website to different screen sizes and resolutions.

Whether you’re using class or function components in React, there are several ways to access the window width value and make your website more responsive.

Conditional Rendering in React

In React, conditional rendering is a powerful technique that enables you to render different components based on certain conditions. It can be used to control what content is displayed on a page, based on user input or other factors.

One of the most common use cases for conditional rendering is to adjust the display of a website based on the window width. In this article, we’ll explore how to use conditional rendering to adjust how your website is displayed based on screen size.

Conditional Rendering Based on Window Width

Conditional rendering based on window width is a powerful technique that can be used to create mobile-first responsive designs. When rendering components based on screen size, you can create different layouts, fonts, and styles that will look good on all screens.

You can use the window.innerWidth property to get the width of the browser window. This value can be used to conditionally render content, depending on whether the screen is a certain width.

Let’s take a look at an example of how you can use conditional rendering to change what content is displayed based on the screen size:

import React from “react”;

function App() {

const screenWidth = window.innerWidth;

return (

{screenWidth > 768 ? (

Desktop View

) : (

Mobile View

)}

);

}

In this example, we used the window.innerWidth property to capture the width of the screen.

If the screen width is greater than 768 pixels, the desktop view component will be rendered. Otherwise, the mobile view component will be shown.

Applying Classes Conditionally

Conditional rendering can also be used to apply classes to components conditionally. This can be useful when you want to create separate styles for mobile and desktop screens.

For example, you might want to create a layout that hides a sidebar on mobile screens. Here’s an example of how to apply classes to a component based on the screen size:

import React from “react”;

function App() {

const screenWidth = window.innerWidth;

const layoutClass = screenWidth > 768 ?

“desktop” : “mobile”;

return (

Conditional Class Rendering

This is some text

);

}

In this example, we defined a layoutClass variable that is used to apply different classes to the container element based on the screen size. If the screen size is greater than 768 pixels, the desktop layout class is applied.

Otherwise, the mobile layout class is used.

Checking Content Fit on a Page

Conditional rendering can also be used to check whether content fits on a page, and adjust what is displayed accordingly. This technique can be useful when you have a lot of content to display, but don’t want to clutter the screen.

You can use the height and width of the component to check if there is enough space to display all of the content. Here’s an example of how to check if content fits on a page and conditionally render an element:

import React from “react”;

function App() {

const [isOverflow, setIsOverflow] = useState(false);

const handleOverflow = () => {

const container = document.querySelector(“.container”);

if (container.scrollHeight > container.clientHeight) {

setIsOverflow(true);

} else {

setIsOverflow(false);

}

};

useEffect(() => {

window.addEventListener(“resize”, handleOverflow);

return () => {

window.removeEventListener(“resize”, handleOverflow);

};

}, []);

return (

Content Heading

“show-more” : “hide-more”}>

This is some text that could potentially overflow the container. We

want to show more text if it overflows, and hide the text if it fits.

);

}

In this example, we used the useState hook to set a boolean value that checks if the content overflows the container. We then used the useEffect hook to add an event listener that checks the overflow value whenever the window is resized.

If the content overflows, we show a “show more” button. Otherwise, we hide the button.to React Hooks

React Hooks were introduced in React version 16.8 as a way to reduce the complexity of React components.

Hooks allow you to use state and other React features inside function components, instead of using class components. They also provide an easier way to reuse code across components, as they can be combined to create powerful custom hooks.

Creating Custom Hooks

One of the benefits of React Hooks is the ability to create custom hooks. Custom hooks can be created to reuse stateful logic across multiple components.

For example, if you use a lot of conditional rendering based on window width in your components, you can create a custom hook to handle this logic for you. Here’s an example of how you can create a custom hook to get the current window size:

import { useState, useEffect } from “react”;

function useWindowDimensions() {

const [windowDimensions, setWindowDimensions] = useState(

getWindowDimensions()

);

function getWindowDimensions() {

const { innerWidth: width, innerHeight: height } = window;

return {

width,

height,

};

}

useEffect(() => {

function handleResize() {

setWindowDimensions(getWindowDimensions());

}

window.addEventListener(“resize”, handleResize);

return () => window.removeEventListener(“resize”, handleResize);

}, []);

return windowDimensions;

}

In this example, we created a custom hook called “useWindowDimensions”.

The hook uses useState to create a state variable called “windowDimensions”, which is set to the value returned by the “getWindowDimensions” function. We also used useEffect to add an event listener that updates the “windowDimensions” variable whenever the window is resized.

Using the useWindowDimensions Hook

Once you’ve created a custom hook, you can use it in your components. Here’s an example of how you can use the useWindowDimensions hook:

import React from “react”;

import useWindowDimensions from “./useWindowDimensions”;

function App() {

const { height, width } = useWindowDimensions();

return (

Window height: {height}

Window width: {width}

);

}

In this example, we imported the useWindowDimensions hook from another file.

We then used the hook to get the current window height and width, and displayed it inside a div.

Conclusion

Conditional rendering and React Hooks are powerful techniques that allow you to build responsive and reusable components for your website. By using conditional rendering based on window width, you can create a custom layout and styles for mobile and desktop screens.

React Hooks provide an easier way to manage state and reusability across components, while custom hooks allow for even more flexibility in creating reusable code. In conclusion, conditional rendering and React Hooks are essential features of React that can help you build responsive and reusable components for your website.

By accessing window width and applying classes conditionally, you can create different layouts and styles for mobile and desktop screens. Creating custom hooks can help you reduce the complexity of your components and reuse stateful logic across multiple components.

Takeaway the practical knowledge of conditional rendering and React Hooks and use them to design a more responsive and user-friendly website that adapts to various screen sizes, styles, and browser windows.

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