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Manipulating Text Content in HTML Using JavaScript and CSS

How to Dynamically Change Text Content in

HTML using inner

HTML and textContent

If you’re building a JavaScript-powered website, you’ll want to know how to dynamically change the text content of an

HTML element. With two simple JavaScript properties, inner

HTML and textContent, you can easily manipulate the text content of any

HTML element.

inner

HTML Attribute

The inner

HTML attribute is a setter method that allows you to change the

HTML content within a live element. It works by overwriting the existing content within the element with new

HTML code that you’ve defined.

Let’s take a look at an example.

Say you have the following

HTML element in your website:

“`

Hello, world!

“`

You can use the inner

HTML attribute to change the text content of the element like this:

“`

document.getElementById(“myDiv”).inner

HTML = “Goodbye, world!”;

“`

The above code replaces the text “Hello, world!” within the `myDiv` element with “Goodbye, world!”.

While the inner

HTML attribute is effective at quickly changing the

HTML content on a page, it does come with a security risk. If you’re using inner

HTML to modify user-generated content, you’re opening your application up to cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks.

To mitigate this risk, it’s best to use textContent instead.

textContent Attribute

The textContent attribute is a safer option for dynamically changing the text content of an

HTML element. It works by manipulating the child nodes of the selected element, which means it only modifies the text content within the element and not the

HTML code.

Let’s look at an example.

If you have a `div` element with some text content like this:

“`

Hello, safe world!

“`

You can change the text content of the element using textContent like this:

“`

document.getElementById(“mySafeDiv”).textContent = “Goodbye, safe world!”;

“`

The above code replaces the text “Hello, safe world!” in the `mySafeDiv` element with “Goodbye, safe world!”.

Using textContent instead of inner

HTML drastically reduces the risk of XSS attacks. It’s important to always prioritize security when developing web applications.

Now that you understand how to dynamically change the text content of an

HTML element using inner

HTML and textContent, let’s look at how to select

HTML elements using JavaScript functions.

Selecting

HTML Elements using Various JavaScript Functions

When building a JavaScript-powered website, you’ll need to select

HTML elements using various JavaScript functions. Below are the most commonly used functions for selecting

HTML elements.

getElementById() Function

The getElementById() function selects an

HTML element by its ID. It’s the most commonly used function for selecting a specific element on a page.

Here’s an example:

“`

document.getElementById(“button”).addEventListener(“click”, myFunction);

“`

This code selects the

HTML element with an ID of “button” and adds an event listener for when the button is clicked.

getElementsByClassName Function

The getElementsByClassName() function selects

HTML elements by their

CSS class. It returns an array of

HTML objects.

Here’s an example:

“`

var elements = document.getElementsByClassName(“myClass”);

“`

This code selects all

HTML elements with a

CSS class of “myClass” and returns an array of those elements.

getElementsByName Function

The getElementsByName() function selects

HTML elements by their name attribute. It also returns an array of

HTML objects.

Here’s an example:

“`

var inputs = document.getElementsByName(“firstName”);

“`

This code selects all

HTML elements with a name attribute of “firstName” and returns an array of those elements.

getElementsByTagName Function

The getElementsByTagName() function selects

HTML elements by their tag name. It also returns an array of

HTML objects.

Here’s an example:

“`

var paras = document.getElementsByTagName(“p”);

“`

This code selects all

HTML elements with a tag name of “p” and returns an array of those elements.

querySelector Function

The querySelector() function selects the first

HTML element that matches a specified

CSS query.

Here’s an example:

“`

var element = document.querySelector(“#myContainer .myClass”);

“`

This code selects the first

HTML element that has an ID of “myContainer” and a

CSS class of “myClass”.

querySelectorAll Function

The querySelectorAll() function selects all

HTML elements that match a specified

CSS query. It returns an array of

HTML objects.

Here’s an example:

“`

var elements = document.querySelectorAll(“div p”);

“`

This code selects all `p` elements that are children of a `div` element and returns an array of those elements.

Conclusion

In this article, we’ve discussed how to dynamically change the text content of an

HTML element using inner

HTML and textContent. While inner

HTML is an effective method for changing

HTML content, it comes with a security risk. TextContent is a safer alternative that works by modifying the child nodes within an element.

We’ve also looked at the most commonly used JavaScript functions for selecting

HTML elements. By using these functions in combination with inner

HTML and textContent, you can create dynamic and interactive websites that respond to user actions. Changing Div Text Using :after Pseudo-element

In web development, there are many ways to manipulate the text and content of

HTML elements. One of the lesser-known methods is using the :after pseudo-element in

CSS. This powerful tool allows you to add additional content, such as text or images, to an

HTML element. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the :after pseudo-element and how it can be used to manipulate the text content of a div element.

What is the :after Pseudo-element? The :after pseudo-element is a

CSS selector that allows the creation of content that appears after the content of an element. It can be used to add text, images, or even

HTML code to a webpage. The content added using the :after pseudo-element is not part of the document tree and is, therefore, inaccessible to screen readers and other assistive technologies.

The syntax for using the :after pseudo-element is as follows:

“`

selector:after {

content: “”;

}

“`

The `selector` refers to the

HTML element that you want to add content to, such as a div. The content attribute is where you specify what you want added to the element.

You can add text, images, or even

HTML code to this attribute. Using the :after Pseudo-element to Change Text Content

The :after pseudo-element can also be used to change the text content of an

HTML element. This is particularly useful when you want to replace a section of text with an image or icon.

Here’s how to use the :after pseudo-element to replace text with an icon:

HTML

“`

Hello World

“`

CSS

“`

.emoji {

font-size: 24px;

}

.emoji:after {

content: url(‘https://image.flaticon.com/icons/svg/25/25469.svg’);

margin-left: 4px;

}

“`

In the above example, we have used the :after pseudo-element to add an icon to the right of the text “Hello World”. The content attribute is set to the URL of the image we want to use.

We’ve also added a margin to the left of the icon to separate it from the text. Using the :after Pseudo-element as Image Replacement

Another use for the :after pseudo-element is to replace images with text on hover.

This is particularly useful for creating accessible websites where users who have difficulty seeing images can still understand what the image represents.

HTML

“`

A heart icon

“`

CSS

“`

.image {

position: relative;

display: inline-block;

}

.image:after {

content: “Heart”;

font-size: 16px;

color: white;

background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);

padding: 4px;

position: absolute;

top: 50%;

left: 50%;

transform: translate(-50%, -50%);

z-index: 1;

opacity: 0;

pointer-events: none;

transition: opacity 0.3s ease;

}

.image:hover:after {

opacity: 1;

pointer-events: auto;

}

“`

In the above example, we have used the :after pseudo-element to replace the image of a heart icon with the text “Heart”. We’ve positioned the text on top of the image using absolute positioning, and added a background and padding to make the text more visible.

By default, the text is hidden with 0 opacity and pointer-events set to none. On hover, the opacity and pointer-events are changed to make the text visible and clickable.

This provides a more accessible solution for users who may not be able to see the image.

Conclusion

The :after pseudo-element is a powerful tool in web development for manipulating the content of

HTML elements. It allows the addition of text, images, or

HTML code to an element, and can be used to replace text with images, or images with text. With the right implementation, the :after pseudo-element can help create more accessible and interactive websites that are enjoyable for all users.

In this article, we explored various methods to manipulate the text and content of

HTML elements using JavaScript and

CSS. We learned how to use the inner

HTML and textContent attributes to dynamically change the text content of div elements, and the :after pseudo-element to add or replace text with images. These techniques not only make web development easier and more efficient, but also promote accessibility and user engagement.

By prioritizing security and utilizing these powerful tools, developers can create websites that are both functional and user-friendly.

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